Water Management

Addressing water challenges requires that water managers apply an integrated and interdisciplinary approach, involving hydrological, biophysical, chemical, economic, institutional, legal, policymaking and planning aspects. The Water Management Programme provides such an approach.

Please read all information carefully

Click on the specialization of your interest and read all information carefully or visit our Frequently Asked Questions page. Most likely you will find the answer to your question there!

Specializations of Water Management

Water Conflict Management

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    What is Delft based

    This programme will run entirely at UNESCO-IHE in Delft, the Netherlands

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    Delft based

Water Resources Management

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    What is Delft based

    This programme will run entirely at UNESCO-IHE in Delft, the Netherlands

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    Delft based

Water Services Management

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    What is Delft based

    This programme will run entirely at UNESCO-IHE in Delft, the Netherlands

    close
    Delft based

Water Quality Management

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    What is Delft based

    This programme will run entirely at UNESCO-IHE in Delft, the Netherlands

    close
    Delft based
MSc Programmes

New: Tailor-made Study Profiles in Water Management MSc Programme

From the academic year 2014-2016 onwards it will be possible for students to compose their own study trajectory within the Water Management Master Programme. After a foundation phase during which students are exposed to the different disciplines involved in the water management domain, students can compile a study profile from a wide range of available courses and variety of thesis research topics to ensure that the educational programme is fully aligned with their professional needs.

They will be guided in this process by professional coaches who will encourage students to reflect on their knowledge and skills, advice them on career possibilities and assist them in selecting a suitable tailor-made study profile. The coaches have extensive knowledge on the needs of the water sector in various parts of the world and student's employers will be consulted in the process.

Where appropriate, students can also opt for one of the thematic study profiles, including water resources management, water services management, water conflict management and water quality management. An integration phase towards the end of the taught part of the programme will ensure that students get hands on experience with integrated approaches and multidisciplinary collaboration.

We believe that maximum flexibility within an overall framework of the Water Management Master Programme and career-oriented advice are essential to improve the learning experience of our students and will increase the impact of our education on the water sector.

What does this mean for prospective students?

Prospective water management students have two options:

Aim of the programme

The programme brings together the scientific study of water resources with practical planning and management skills. Participants are encouraged to study water management from a multi-disciplinary perspective and to seek integrated solutions. Twelve months of blended and innovative learning methods, including lectures, laboratory and field work, case studies, group work, role-plays and self-study, are complemented by six months of applied research in the field of water management theory and practice.

The Water Management Masters Programme aims to develop knowledge, insight and skills required to design, implement and evaluate water management policies and strategies to achieve effective governance of water resources. Once they have successfully completed this programme, graduates will be able to:

  • describe the rational for an integrated and interdisciplinary approach for managing the water system;
  • identify and critically assess the different functions of the water resources system and the – often competing – interests of the various water users;
  • design, apply and evaluate models for institutional arrangements with emphasis on institutional reforms, policy development and good governance;
  • conduct, independently or in a multidisciplinary team, research. 

Context

Many regions of the world are increasingly facing challenges when it comes to managing water, and the nature of these challenges differs from one location to the next. It may relate to having too little water while water demands are growing explosively (water scarcity), too much water (flooding), and water of poor quality rendering them unfit to sustain the ecosystem or challenges related to providing water for people, industry and agriculture.